|     North Worcestershire Lifeguard Club

North Worcestershire Lifeguard Club

Competitive Lifeguarding

We are a highly competitive club, offering the chance to compete at all levels. We enter a range of events from local galas to World Championships... 

Thinking of joining the Club?

We teach lifesavers from age eight to eighty in both pool and open water lifesaving. To be able to act in an emergency to save lives, both in and out of water...

In the Community

Safety is not just something we learn at the pool. Our aim educate our community about staying safe and how to deal with injuries or medical emergencies at home, work or play...

Welcome to North Worcester Lifeguard Club

Lifesaving sport was primarily developed to encourage lifeguards to, maintain and improve the essential physical and mental skills needed to save lives in the aquatic environment. It has now grown into an international competitive swimming discipline. There are Stillwater or Surf Competitions.

 

Competitive Sport – Stillwater
There are two types of competitive lifesaving competition. Each designed to heighten the ability and the focus of the lifesavers involved. For speed swimmers there is the lifesaving Speed competitions (Speeds), and for the thinkers, there is the incident competitions.

Lifesaving Speed Competitions:
These competitions are held much like a swim gala. Each lane with an individual competitor racing to complete the challenge in the quickest time. There are a number of events, each based around lifesaving.
200m Obstacles: Straight swim race, with a gate, one metre deep, every twenty-five metres.
50m Manikin Carry: A 25m sprint followed by a 25m tow of a casualty
100m Manikin Carry: As above but split into two longer sections while wearing rescue fins
100m Manikin Tow: A 50m sprint with a torpedo buoy, collect a manikin to tow it back 50m.
12m Line Throw: A club speciality, The competitor stands on the poolside, coils a rope as fast as they can, throws it out to a casualty and pulls them in. This is often over after 10 seconds. As a club we boast numerous European and World Medals.

Incident Competitions:
These competitions are the only way to imitate the pressure of a real-life situation. Depending on the competition, competitors compete individually in pairs or in groups of four or six. As the competitors come into the incident arena, they come across a range of problems, drowning casualties, bleeding casualties. Asthmatics, Epileptics, Panic and Shock. All to be resolved within three minutes. Teams are marked on their ability to assess the situation, their personal safety and their aftercare. These competitions are the true test of a lifesavers skills.

The Competitions
All pool events are timed and the fastest time wins. Record times exist for British, European and World categories – as well as all important athlete PB times.

Obstacles
With a dive entry, the competitor swims the course passing under the immersed obstacles to touch the finish wall of the pool.

Obstacle Relay
With a dive entry, the first competitor swims passing under immersed obstacles. After the first competitor touches the turn wall the second, third, and fourth competitors repeat the procedure in turn.

Manikin Carry
With a dive start, the competitor swims 25 m freestyle and then dives to recover a submerged manikin to the surface within 5 m of the pick-up line. The competitor then carries the manikin to touch the finish wall of the pool.

Manikin Carry with Fins
With a dive start, the competitor swims 50 m freestyle wearing fins and then recovers a submerged manikin to the surface within 10m of the turn wall. The competitor carries the manikin to touch the finish wall of the pool.

Manikin Tow with Fins
With a dive start, competitors swims 50m freestyle with fins and rescue tube. After touching the turn wall, and within the 5 m pick-up zone, the competitor fixes the rescue tube correctly around a manikin and tows it to the finish. The event is complete when the competitor touches the finish wall of the pool.

Rescue Medley
With a dive start, the competitors swims 50 m freestyle to turn, dive, and swim underwater to a submerged manikin located at 17.5 m from the turn wall. The competitor surfaces the manikin within the 5 m pick-up line, and then carries it the remaining distance to touch the finish wall. Competitors may breathe during the turn, but not after their feet leave the turn wall until they surface with the manikin.

Super Lifesaver
With a dive start on an acoustic signal, the competitor swims 75 m freestyle and then dives to recover a submerged manikin. The competitor surfaces the manikin within the 5 m pickup zone and carries it to the turn wall. After touching the wall the competitor releases the manikin. In the water, the competitor dons fins and rescue tube and swims 50 m freestyle. After touching the wall, and within the 5 m pick-up zone, the competitor fixes the rescue tube correctly around a manikin and tows it to the finish. The event is complete when the competitor touches the finish wall of the pool.

Line Throw
One competitor throws a weighted line to a fellow team member located in the water on the near side of a rigid crossbar located 12 m distant. The competitor pulls this “victim” back to the finish wall of the pool.

Medley Relay
With a dive start on an acoustic signal, the first competitor swims 50 m freestyle without fins. With a dive start after the first competitor touches the wall, the second competitor swims 50 m freestyle with fins. With a dive start after the second competitor touches the wall, the third competitor swims 50 m freestyle towing a rescue tube. The third competitor touches the turn wall. The fourth competitor, in the water wearing fins with at least one hand on the turn wall, dons the harness. The third competitor, playing the role of “victim”, holds the rescue tube with both hands while being towed 50 m by the fourth competitor to the finish.

Manikin Relay
Four competitors in turn carry a manikin approximately 25 m each.

SERC (Simulated Emergency Response Competition)
The Simulated Emergency Response Competition tests the initiative, judgement, knowledge, and abilities of four lifesavers who, acting as a team – under the direction of a team leader – apply lifesaving skills in a simulated emergency situation unknown to them prior to the start. This competition is judged within a two-minute time limit. These competitions are the only way to imitate the pressure of a real-life situation. Depending on the competition, competitors compete individually in pairs or in groups of four or six. As the competitors come into the incident arena, they come across a range of problems, drowning casualties, bleeding casualties. Asthmatics, Epileptics, Panic and Shock. All to be resolved within three minutes. Teams are marked on their ability to assess the situation, their personal safety and their aftercare. These competitions are the true test of a lifesavers skills.

Surf Competitons

Events involve elements of surf swimming, board riding, sand running, mock rescues using rowed surf boats, and paddling special kayak-like surf skis.
Some events are for individuals, but many are team events.

Surf Race
With a running start into the surf (sea) from the start line on the beach, competitors swim around a course designated by buoys, returning to shore to finish between the finish flags on the beach.

Surf Team Race
This is the same event as the Surf Race, but in teams of three and the overall positions of each swimmer added together.

Board Race
At the start signal, competitors enter the water, launch their boards, and paddle the course marked by buoys, return to the beach, and run to cross the finish line.

Board Relay
The board relay race shall be conducted under the general rules of the board race. Teams shall consist of three competitors who must compete the course and then run and tag the next competitor.

Ski Race
Competitors steady their skis in line in knee-deep water about 1.5 m apart. Competitors must obey directions from the starter or check starter concerning ski alignment at the start. On the starting signal, competitors paddle their skis around the course marked by buoys and return to finish when any part of the ski crosses the in-water finish line – ridden, gripped, or carried by the competitor.

Ski Relay
The ski relay race shall be conducted under the general rules of the ski race. Teams shall consist of three competitors who must compete the course and then run and tag the next competitor.

Oceanman/Oceanwoman
Competitors cover a 1400 m (approx.) course that includes a swim leg, a board leg, a ski leg. Conditions of racing of each leg are generally required for the individual condition of that discipline including the rules governing the component disciplines: surf ski races, board races, surf races.

Taplin Relay (Oceanman/Oceanwoman Relay)
Teams of three competitors (one swimmer, one board paddler, one surf ski paddler) cover the course in a sequence of legs determined by draw at the start of each competition.

Tube Rescue
Pair’s event: a “victim,” one rescue tube swimmer. The victim swims to a designated buoy, signals, and waits to be rescued by the rescue tube swimmer. The event finishes when the first competitor in a pair crosses the finish line while in contact with the other team member.

Board Rescue
In this event, one member of the team swims to a designated buoy, signals, and waits to be picked up by the second member of the team on a board. They both paddle to shore and cross the finish line on the beach with the board.

Run – Swim – Run
From the start line, competitors run to pass around the turning flag and enter the water to swim out to and around the buoys. Competitors swim back to the beach to again run round the turning flag before running to the finish line.

Beach

Beach Sprint
Competitors take positions in their allotted lanes. At the starting signal, competitors race the 90 m course to the finish line. The finish is judged on the chest crossing the finish line. Competitors must finish the event on their feet in an upright position.

Beach Sprint Relay
Teams of four runners (three in Masters) compete in baton relay fashion over a 90 m course. To start, competitors take positions in their allotted lane at each end of the course. After the start each competitor completes a leg of the course with a baton and passes the baton to the next runner. All competitors must finish their leg of the event on their feet and in an upright position.

Beach Flags
A “knock Out” heat event. From a prone starting position, competitors rise, turn and race to grab a baton (beach flag) buried upright in the sand approximately 20m away. Since there are fewer batons than competitors, those who fail to grab a baton are eliminated. Competitors take their allotted positions, a minimum of 1.5 m apart at the start line, face down with their toes on the start line with heels together, hands on top of each other with fingertips to wrists and head up. Elbows should be 90 degrees to the body’s midline and hips and stomach must be in contact with the sand. The body’s midline should be 90 degrees to the start line. Competitors may level, flatten, and compress their starting area but no scooping of the sand or digging, or digging in of the feet is permitted. Why all these detailed regulations? This is a highly competitive, tactical and very physical event where every advantage possible is taken and the outcome is based on split seconds where tiny details can make the win or lose difference.

New Members

We are a friendly group, dedicated to developing lifesaving and first aid skills and opportunities to get involved with lifesaving sport from local to international level...

Competitive Sport

We are a highly competitive club, offering the chance to compete at all levels. We enter a range of events from local galas to World Championships... 

Community

Safety is not just something we learn at the pool. Our aim educate our community about staying safe and how to deal with injuries or medical emergencies at home, work or play...

Contact Details

E: info@nwlgc.co.uk
P: 01384 654321

North Worcestershire Lifeguard Club
is a registered charity
(Number 05333767) in England and Wales,
and a member of the
Royal Life Saving Society
and the Surf Life Saving Society.

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